When to Contact a Medicare Fraud Attorney

Are you a victim of Medicare fraud?  If you’re deciding whether to report potential fraud with a Medicare fraud attorney, use the list of situations below to help guide your decision. Each of the three scenarios listed below is an example of a fraudulent Medicare charge.

It is important to always review your medical bill. This is how you will become aware of potentially fraudulent Medicare charges. If anything on your bill seems suspicious, don’t hesitate to look into it further.

1. Your Medical Bill Includes Services Which Were Not Performed
As you review your bill, you may become aware of items which were billed but not performed. If you don’t remember a listed procedure, test or service being performed, get more information immediately. Fraudulent charges occur when a medical firm hopes to slip extra charges into your bill without anyone noticing. It is important to check your bill for extra services so this fraud can be caught.

2. Your Medical Bill Includes Services Which Were Deficient Or Worthless
If you were charged for services that did not render the appropriate treatment, you may want to consider contacting a Medicare fraud attorney. If tests, procedures or medical services were not performed to medical industry standards, or if the service in question was deficient in some way, the medical firm billing for the service should not include this service on the bill. Watch your bill to make sure deficient or worthless items to not appear.

3. Your Medical Bill Includes Fees For Services Which Were Not Necessary
Did you receive treatment or tests that were not necessary? Some medical firms perform unnecessary services so they can bill them. This is a dehumanizing way for a medical office to make an extra buck, and is a good reason to discuss your potential case with a Medicare fraud attorney.

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